Releases

Releases

After nearly four months, school principals report that Novopay has not improved the standard of its delivery and for many it has now become ‘mission impossible’,’ says Paul Drummond, President of the New Zealand Principals’ Federation.

‘We have just conducted our third survey’, said Drummond, ‘and the results show we still have 90% of principals telling us that they have unresolved issues from previous pay rounds and that in 70% of schools at least one staff member is not paid correctly in the latest pay round. 87% of principals have no confidence in the system.’

The achievement of New Zealand children in literacy, numeracy and science is regularly assessed by the OECD. New Zealand is ranked as a world class system of education, and has achieved in the top ten countries of the world for several years.

‘It bewilders us that the Secretary for Education cannot understand that New Zealand has had a world-class system of education for some years,’ says Peter Simpson, Past President of the New Zealand Principals’ Federation. ‘The world ranking cannot be disputed.  It is a fact,’ he said.

‘A survey conducted by the New Zealand Principals’ Federation (NZPF) shows that 90% of schools are still struggling to get the Ministry to resolve problems created by the new Novopay system,’ says Paul Drummond, NZPF President.

‘Principals are becoming increasingly frustrated trying to implement a payroll system that is repeatedly failing them, not resolving old issues and throwing up new ones,’ he said. 

The Ministry’s latest report showing that 49% of writing assessments were marked incorrectly and the accuracy of maths assessment varied from 18% to 90% is clear evidence that there is something radically wrong with the national standards as an assessment instrument,’ said Paul Drummond, President of the New Zealand Principals’ Federation.

‘If you can demonstrate such a high level of inaccuracy four years after the introduction of national standards there has to be something fundamentally wrong with them,’ says Drummond.

The 1,460 Australian and New Zealand principals attending the Trans-Tasman conference in Melbourne this week today stood unanimously together to put children back at the centre of educational decision-making.

The agreed resolution, read by the New Zealand Principals’ Federation president, Paul Drummond, is as follows:

President of the New Zealand Principals’ Federation, Paul Drummond, today said, ‘The three major findings expressed in the latest ERO report concur with current principals’ thinking.’

The three-fold findings are first, that if we want to lift the achievement of children not succeeding as well as their peers, students should be at the heart of learning and teaching. Secondly, teachers need to implement a responsive curriculum in schools and thirdly, we need to improve in the way we use assessment and evaluation processes so that they are responsive to information about students.

The Minister of Education has announced that the national standards data from this year, despite its unreliability, is to be placed in the public arena. The data is for literacy and numeracy only.  The Minister says the purpose of publishing the data is to lift children’s achievement and give parents quality information about different schools. 

‘New Zealanders are getting very confused messages from government about what ‘quality’ means’, said Paul Drummond, President of the New Zealand Principals’ Federation.  

‘The Minister’s announcement to trial an imported model of ‘charter school’ prompts us to ask ‘what is so wrong with the public school model we have now?’ said Paul Drummond, President of the New Zealand Principals’ Federation.

President of the New Zealand Principals’ Federation, Paul Drummond today applauded New Zealand’s leading educational researchers for taking a public stand against league tables.  The Prime Minister has suggested that parents want league tables so they can compare schools.

School principals in the Wellington region have been asked to provide ‘student performance data’ to a Dominion Post journalist. ‘We predicted four years ago that this was a likely outcome if national standards went ahead,’ said Paul Drummond, President of the New Zealand Principals’ Federation. ‘It’s exactly what has happened in other countries where national standards or testing have been introduced,’ he said.

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