Releases

Releases

Primary school leaders today overwhelmingly expressed a lack of confidence in the Government’s $359m Investing in Educational Success policy at a forum in Wellington today.

NZEI Te Riu Roa National President Judith Nowotarski said leaders from national and regional principal and teacher groups have sent a clear message to the Government that the policy, as it currently stands, is unacceptable and unworkable.

Primary School leaders are meeting in Wellington tomorrow to discuss the Government’s $359-m education initiative.

The forum is being jointly convened by NZEI and NZ Principals’ Federation to discuss what is proposed to be the biggest change in the way schools are managed in the past 25 years.

“This is a fundamental system change that needs further discussion and consultation with school communities including Boards of Trustees and parents,” said NZEI National President Judith Nowotarski. 

School Principals from across the country gathered in Wellington on Friday to discuss the latest government policy, ‘Investing for Educational Success’. They recommended that continued participation by principals in this initiative is contingent upon some key conditions.

 ‘Our principal representatives from the regions had a vigorous and informed discussion on the policy,’ said Philip Harding, president of the New Zealand Principals’ Federation (NZPF). 

‘Schools are being driven to distraction by the latest Novopay issue to hit schools,’ says Philip Harding, President of the New Zealand Principals’ Federation (NZPF).

‘Reconciling the stated payroll position against school records has become the latest nightmare for schools and yet again the increased workload is intolerable,’ said Harding. 

Principals across the country have become increasingly concerned about the direction and implementation of the Investing in Educational Success proposition which was announced by the Prime Minister in January, and are now asking in increasing numbers why the Principals’ Federation remains engaged with the initiative.

Acting President of the New Zealand Principals’ Federation (NZPF), Denise Torrey, has today expressed deep concerns that the $359m Government plan for enhancing school leadership is not based on reliable evidence and the money could end up being wasted in a failed experiment.

The Prime Minister announced a plan to pour $359m over four years into a scheme to pay some principals and teachers more so that other principals and teachers can share their expertise.

President of the New Zealand Principals’ Federation (NZPF), Philip Harding, has today expressed the frustration of the school sector by laying an official complaint with the Ministry of Education for the continuing underperformance of the Novopay payroll system.

‘Either Talent2, the provider company, is deliberately misleading the Ministry by not reporting accurate levels of problems or the Ministry itself is covering up the real extent of the issues that schools continue to have with Novopay every day,’ he said.

School principals report that the Novopay payroll system that caused so much chaos when it was first introduced is still struggling to deliver accuracy, and judging by their feedback, principals are still hugely frustrated at the inadequacies of a system that continues to suck their patience dry. 

‘The Labour party’s plans to address inequality through increasing free early-childhood education for 3 – 5-year olds to 25 hours a week and provide additional support in health and housing is welcomed by New Zealand school principals,’ said Philip Harding, President of the New Zealand Principals’ Federation.

‘We all know that the ‘out of school’ factors that influence children’s underachievement add up to sixty percent of the variance,’ he said. 

Principals have welcomed the Green Party’s announcement to establish on site community hubs for low decile schools to address the inequalities which affect learning for one in four children in New Zealand.

 ‘We know that sixty percent of the variance around under achievement relates to influences that reside ‘out of the school’ and are socioeconomic in nature,’ said Philip Harding, President of the New Zealand Principals’ Federation (NZPF).

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